Tag Archives: soil health

Weeds: Guardians of the soil

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weeds: guardians of the soil by Joseph A. Cocannouer

that is a link to a free pdf copy from the Soil and Health Library. it is out of print now but I splashed out at abebooks and bought myself a secondhand hardback copy the other day after someone lent me theirs on the annual Astrotas weed walk.
weeds coveri have yet to find a modern equivalent, and as the soil health librarian, Steve Solomon, an expat american who now lives in Tasmania says;
” The wisest student learns from the originators of a body of knowledge because those who later follow in the founders’ footsteps are not trailblazers of equivalent depth. This is especially true of the writings from many post WWII academics and professors who mainly write because they must publish . . . or perish. Even when the earliest works in a field contain errors because their authors lacked some bit of data or had a fact wrong, their books still contain enormous wisdom. If nothing else, study of older books lets us discover that the conditions that prevail today aren’t the way things always were—whilst on some levels, some things hardly ever change at all. ” Australians may order/contribute electronic copies of out of print books on soil and health from him (including the weed book but the other link is quicker and is a nicely presented copy).
I love weeds 🙂 They do not try to kill me the way our cultivated plants do – i do not know why that is, touchwood. Perhaps it is because i have had a leaky gut and until now have not eaten them.
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June 2012 Meeting – Leicester Jones, naturopath

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Wow – a power packed talk. Leicester’s approach to gardening and health are one and the same – get your soil right and feed your family from it. He overcame his own infantile rickets and juvenile arthritis. Everyone agreed Leicester has to come back and share some more of his treasury of information later in the year.

A few highlights;
Kelp – is his preferred fertiliser as every nutrient we have in our bodies is the same as the ocean in the right proportions. Animal manures are defficient as the nutrition has gone into the animal ( milk, meat, bone etc.) Place a square of  dried bullkelp under new plants when setting them out.

Mutton Bird oil – sustainably harvested local product that is a top grade source of omega 3 oil and vitamin A which is the start for building up health. $20 500ml + postage from Bruce Bensammen 63561430 or $30 litre from Yolla Products. Can be used topically if you don’t like the idea of taking it orally ( editor’s note: ocean omega’s are actually so sure of their products they offer a refund if you are not satisfied. Vegetarians may want to consider the ultimate source of the bird’s omega fats – algae. Nordic Naturals make an algal based omega supplement. If you want to buy it from iherb.com I have had no trouble with many shipments from them and the flat rate postage is only $6 which is cheaper than most australian companies.)

The inspirational Tasmanian Regions magazine put out by DPIPWE (Request a printed version from Simon 62336859 mentioned by Leicester) is also available online – Winter issue

http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/WebPages/PWOD-8UXVE9?open

Be aware of  how supermarket food is grown and processed.  Food Inc. both the book by Peter Pringle and the DVD Film mentioned are available from the Library. Pyrethrum has replaced DDT but it is still a neurotoxin – avoid. Unfortunately the barcode number is NOT a guarantee of country of origin if you choose to avoid foods from Asian countries such as China which have no food inspection laws – read the label, ring the company when in doubt. 93″ merely means the parent company is Australian not the ingredients.

My recipe for Raw Spicy Flax Crackers
Food processor required Dehydrator required
2 cup flax seeds, 2 cups water, 1 cup fresh coriander or parsley, 1 red bell pepper, 2T lime or lemon juice,
2T soy or tamari or teaspoon seasalt, 2T curry powder, teaspoon fresh grated ginger, teaspoon fresh garlic crushed

Place flax seed and water in a large bowl and soak overnight in the fridge. Mixture will be covered in goo in the morning. DO NOT RINSE. You want the goo.
Blend all remaining ingredients in a processor until fine.
Add to the bowl with the flax seeds and goo and mix with a spoon. Mixture should be thick and goopy.
Spread mixture about 4mm thick over dehydrator sheets, score into cracker sizes and dehydrate for 8 hours at medium heat (under 50 C) best done overnight. Turn and dehydrate again briefly until crispy. makes about 48 crackers